Steel Art for Buckeye

The steel artwork of desert flora and fauna has been underway for 2 years. It is exciting to see thick steel turned into recognizable barrel cactus, prickly pear, saguaro and ocotillo. In a short while you will be crossing the intersection of Monroe Avenue and 4th Street in Historic Downtown Buckeye and spot the colorful cacti and animals. This project has been a collaboration of many artists like inmates at the Florence Corrections Facility who fabricated the saguaro and ocotillo sculptures, Charlene Powers Broadbent of Powers Leavitt Insurance who initially came up with the concepts and Serbin Studio Architects who designed the patterns.

Zach Shamblin welding the base of Steel Cut Barrel Cactus

Zach Shamblin welding the base of Steel Cut Barrel Cactus



The barrel cactus and prickly pear are currently being fabricated by Buckeye Union High School welding Instructor Alijandro Jimenez and welding students. Many hours have been spent cutting, knocking off excess, grinding, and making smooth.

As student Jonathan Celaya pointed out, “Many connections on the prickly pear sculpture we had to fill in the gap with all the multiple angled connections.” Once metal fill is applied, the rough connection gets smoothed out.

Smooth Connections

Smooth Connections

Jonathan Celaya taps off rough from the steel cut barrel cactus.

Gap between angled steel prickly pear pads.

Gap between angled steel prickly pear pads.

Multiple angled connections on Prickly Pear Cactus

Multiple angled connections on Prickly Pear Cactus

It takes lots of attention to detail to bring a flat sheet of steel to life. Some of the tricks are seen here in the road runner. The wings of the bird aren’t just welded directly to the bird body. To give this fast desert bird some 3 dimensional quality and shadow effect, metal spacers are used in between the wing and body. This same technique is used on the previous steel sculpture of the barrel racer. These pieces will be taken to Glendale Powder Coating next week! More to follow on this exciting project for Downtown Buckeye!

Metal spacers between Road Runner wing and body.

Metal spacers between Road Runner wing and body.

Anthony Miglio and Jonathan Celaya welding students at Buckeye Union High School

Anthony Miglio and Jonathan Celaya welding students at Buckeye Union High School

Talkin’ Trash

This week Hondo Jimenez and Buckeye Union High School Welding students are cutting, shaping and building 2 of the 4 steel cut structures to go along with custom fabricated trash cans.  This project started in 2017 as part of the 4th Street and Monroe roadway intersection beautification project.

Steel Barrel Cactus Trash Can Art to be located at the SE corner of 4th Street and Monroe

Steel Barrel Cactus Trash Can Art to be located at the SE corner of 4th Street and Monroe

 

Zachery Shamblin and Hondo Jimenez  Zachery and Alejandro are figuring out how the Roadrunner wings could be welded in place. Maybe one wing up and one down. They are winging it.

Zachery Shamblin and Hondo Jimenez
Zachery and Alejandro are figuring out how the Roadrunner wings could be welded in place. Maybe one wing up and one down. They are winging it.

 

Steel Ocotillo Trash Can Art to be located at the NW corner of 4th Street and Monroe

Steel Ocotillo Trash Can Art to be located at the NW corner of 4th Street and Monroe

Steel Prickly Pear Trash Can Art to be located at the SW corner of 4th Street and Monroe

Steel Prickly Pear Trash Can Art to be located at the SW corner of 4th Street and Monroe

L to R: Zachery Shamblin and Chase Simmons

L to R: Zachery Shamblin and Chase Simmons

 

The photo above is the steel Prickly Pear pads. The pads will be tack welded initially so the students can study the composition before the final welding. The overall prickly pear structure cannot overhang the steel plate it will be attached to at the base.

Steel Saguaro Trash Can Art to be located at the NE corner of 4th Street and Monroe

Steel Saguaro Trash Can Art to be located at the NE corner of 4th Street and Monroe

The students are making steel art for their downtown. The Buckeye Union High School they attend is in walking distance to the steel structures.  We thank them for all the dedication and time spent on this worthwhile project make one more step close to attracting more activity and visitors to Historic Downtown Buckeye, Arizona.

Harold Lyon, Artist Contributes Bold Western Paintings

By: Lara Serbin, Buckeye Main Street Coalition

Buckeye Main Street Coalition has recently acquired enough Harold Lloyd Lyon original Western oil paintings to start an art gallery! Lyon, a Canadian artist hit his stride when he started painting rangy cowboys, vaqueros and Arizona desert landscape beginning in the 1980’s.

Naturally, Lyon would be drawn to Historic Downtown Buckeye, Arizona living in his current Goodyear residence. After meeting Lyon initially, Dorothy Lockard, a Buckeye Main Street Coalition member confided, ”He’s a believer!” Lyon’s career is full of revitalization efforts like wall murals in Chemainus Vancouver Island British Columbia.

Lyon believes “When one great artist contributes work it attracts other artists to show what they can do.”  The paintings he has generously donated to Buckeye Main Street Coalition will be displayed in Buckeye public buildings soon. He has donated boxes of oil paints, easels and copies of his self-published classic, “Creating Illusions” that will be available for purchase.

Bob Boze Bell Comes to Buckeye Days 2016

  Lara Serbin, Buckeye Main Street Coalition It is always exciting times during Buckeye Days, January 23, 30th and 31st will be even more memorable with Bob Boze Bell, owner of True West Magazine coming to the Cattle Drive as the Grand Marshal.  There are many ways to learn who this Arizona Kingman native is by reading his Raised on the Mother Road The 66 Kid: a scrapbook style autobiography which is an easy, hilarious read.  BBB interjects stories of his childhood along the Mother Road  with his amazing watercolors and ink sketches throughout the large print pages. Ever since he picked up his first Billy the Kid postcard during the one and only time his dad even stopped at a roadside museum trinket store BBB became one with Wild West Legends.  You can find him as expert historical reference for the likes of Wyatt Earp on PBS specials, interviewed on the news or heard on the radio.  Growing up in Kingman, he bought his first True West Magazine by saving up all his coins working at his Dad’s filling station.  BBB fulfilled his dream by buying True West Magazine and now owns and operates the funniest, most insightful monthly publication of Western lengends. We are truly honored to have BBB come to Buckeye Days January 30th to continue the tradition of keeping the West Alive in Buckeye, Arizona!

Wild Bill's Last Gunfight

True West Magazine

Here are some questions and answers for you, enjoy! Do you think people will still be writing or painting with their hands in the far flung future? Machines are going to usurp more and more things we do, including art representation, but I believe when it comes to creating art, human choices and the human touch will outlive me. After that, I don’t care. What is your advice for writers block? Write every day, without hope, without despair. If you don’t feel like writing, write that. What is your latest inspiration? I am on the trail of a Buffalo Bill wannabe who shot and killed Vincent van Gogh.

Raised on the Mother Road The 66 Kid, BBB

Raised on the Mother Road The 66 Kid, BBB

Do you believe factual historic answers are linked with intuition? I believe nothing changes more than the past. What went through your head after you bought True West magazine? What kind of a crazy idiot would attempt to save a pulp magazine that is going out of business? What is your big hairy, audacious goal for True West magazine? My staff needs a place to go every day where they can have fun, be creative and be respected for it. That is my job, to make sure they get all of that and get paid for their efforts, to boot. So far, so good. What differentiates True West magazine with other Western mags? Many of the magazines in our field, Wild West, Cowboys & Indians, American Cowboy and Western Horseman do a good job of portraying and servicing the world I love. The difference is, True West has a sense of humor that I don’t think you’ll find in those other magazines. Some see this as a flaw, but I blame it on my upbringing in Kingman. Do you believe ghost towns are haunted? No, I believe we chase ghosts, until the ghosts chase us. When I was growing up, I loved it when my parents took me to ghost towns, like Goldroad, Oatman, White Hills and Mineral Park. I used to fantasize about the lives the people in those towns led, what happened to them? Where did they go? Now, more than a half century later, I see the town I grew up in disappearing and turning into a ghost town. In the end we’re all ghosts to another generation.

Artwork by Bob Boze Bell

Artwork by Bob Boze Bell

If you could chat with any historical figure who would it be? I have a bone to pick with Wyatt Earp. Who the hell fired first at the O.K. Corral fight? I doubt that I could penetrate his defenses, though. He was a cagey bastard, I’ll give him that. Do you ever go on long road trips? Nothing makes me happier than being on the road. My dad taught me that. The only difference between him and me is that I stop for everything, and he stopped for absolutely nothing except gas, food, oil and maybe, open wounds. Growing up in Kingman did you ever make it out to Buckeye, Arizona? We had several rivals in the Valley, especially Buckeye, Tolleson and Agua Fria. We hated Agua Fria the most because they beat the tar out of us every time we met. This was in the 1960s. Next we hated Tolleson and their crackerjack size gym and we once had to have a police escort out of town. Long story short: we were the hayseeds coming down to the sophisticated Valley and well, it was oil and water. Buckeye, on the other hand, had a better class of people, with the possible exception of the Holly family. Just kidding. Fritz Holly is a friend of mine, in spite of being from Buckeye. What’s your approach for a winning team? Funny what you can accomplish if you don’t care who gets the credit. Any one book you read more than once? The book that changed my life and altered the course of Western history is “The Saga of Billy the Kid” by Walter Noble Burns. My mother sent it to me for Christmas in 1989. It’s the inspiration for everything I’ve created since then, including owning True West magazine and the dozen books I’ve published on the Old West. I reread it every chance I get. The other book that thrills me is “Vanished Arizona” by Martha Summerhayes. A must read for anybody who lives in Arizona. If you had a blank check what would you do right now? Finance social security so me and all my geezer friends can still get our checks every month. What music score or song most sounds like the Wild West to you? “Jesus Just Left Chicago” by ZZ Top. Either that, or “Highway to Hell” by AC/DC. I’m a rocker, although Country is catching up. Eric Church is my current fave artist who samples AC/DC and the Stones, among others. My fave being “How ’bout You?” which is an homage to small towns like Buckeye and Kingman.